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Principals’ Leadership Style and Staff Job Performance in Selected Secondary Schools in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria

Goddey Wilson

Abstract


This study examined the relationship between principals’ leadership style and staff job performance in Emohua Local Government Area of River State. The study was carried out within the period of 2007-2016 in secondary schools in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State. Path-Goal theory was adopted as the theoretical framework of analysis for the study. We reviewed the concepts of leadership, leadership style, types of leadership and staff job performance. Questionnaire items and interview methods were used to elicit primary data, and documentary method was applied to collect secondary data for the study. A total of 210 questionnaires containing 21 questionnaire items each were administered, and 195 questionnaires were successfully retrieved without error and used for the study. The primary data were presented and analysed in tabular and percentage frequency. Content analysis was used to analyse the secondary data. The study findings identified 10 different leadership styles adopted by different principals in different secondary schools in the area, and emphasized that the various leadership styles have significant effects on the staff job performance in the schools. Also, the findings proved that the principals face leadership challenges in the discharge of their administrative functions in the schools. Upon the findings, the study recommended that the principals should adopt the needed leadership style in their school to enhance staff job performance, that the various leadership challenge faced by the principals should be addressed accordingly by the government, and that both the principal and government should adopt the recommendations of this study to ensure a better leadership style and adequate staff job performance in the schools.



http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/afrrev.v11i3.12
AJOL African Journals Online