Attitude of Lesotho health care workers towards HIV/AIDS and impact of HIV/AIDS on the population structure

  • JA Belle
  • SB Ferriera
  • A Jordaan

Abstract

Background: The impact and management of HIV/AIDS in Lesotho in the context of disaster management was investigated.
Objectives: Lesotho health care workers’ perception on HIV/AIDS progression, whether HIV/AIDS was managed as a disaster, and the impact on the demographic profile was investigated.
Methods: The empirical investigation included a literature study, and primary and secondary data analyses. Questionnaires (n=116) determined health care workers’ perception of HIV/AIDS. Interviews with officers of Lesotho Disaster Management determined how HIV/AIDS was managed as a disaster. National population censuses and data from surveys were summarised to describe the impact of HIV/AIDS on the population structure. Results: Respondents’ modal age group was 25 to 39 years, 28.4% viewed HIV/AIDS related deaths as very high and perceived that HIV/AIDS changed the age composition, sex and dependency ratio of the population. Although HIV/AIDS was declared a disaster, the Lesotho Disaster Management Authority only aided the National AIDS Commission. There was evidence that HIV/AIDS caused the population pyramid base to shrink, and an indentation in the active population.
Conclusion: Health care workers attributed HIV/AIDS to changing the demographic profile of Lesotho, also reflected in the population pyramid. Lesotho Disaster Management Authority played a supporting role in HIV/AIDS disaster management.

Keywords: Disaster management, HIV/AIDS, Lesotho, population, health care workers

African Health Sciences 2013; 13(4): 1117 - 1125

Author Biographies

JA Belle
Disaster Risk Management Training and Education Centre for Africa Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa
SB Ferriera
Department of Social Work, PO Box 339, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa
A Jordaan
Disaster Risk Management Training and Education Centre for Africa Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa
Published
2014-02-03
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1680-6905