Contraceptive security, information flow, and local adaptations: Family planning Morocco

  • Yasmin Chandani John Snow Inc. 1616 N. Fort Myer Drive, 11th Floor, Arlington, Virginia, USA 22209
  • Gerry Breton John Snow Inc. 1616 N. Fort Myer Drive, 11th Floor, Arlington, Virginia, USA 22209

Abstract

Background : Many developing countries increasingly recognize and acknowledge family planning as a critical part of socio-economic development. However, with few health dollars to go around, countries tend to provide essential drugs for curative care, rather than for family planning products. Donors have historically provided free contraceptives for family planning services.
Whether products are donated or purchased by the country, a successful family planning program depends on an uninterrupted supply of products, beginning with the manufacturer and ending with the customer. Any break in the supply chain may cause a family planning program to fail. A well-functioning logistics system can manage the supply chain and ensure that the customers have the products they need, when they need them.
Methodology : Morocco was selected for the case study. The researchers had ready access to key informants and information about the Logistics Management Information System. Because the study had time and resource constraints, research included desktop reviews and interview, rather than data collection in the field.
Results : The case study showed that even in a challenging environment an LMIS can be successfully deployed and fully supported by the users. It is critical to customize the system to a country-specific situation to ensure buy-in for the implementation.
Conclusions : Significant external supportfunding and technical expertiseare critical components to ensure the initial success of the system. Nonetheless, evidence from the case study shows that, after a system has been implemented, the benefits may not ensure its institutionalization. Other support, including local funding and technical expertise, is required.

African Health Sciences 2001; 1(2): 73-82
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Articles

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eISSN: 1680-6905