Chronic renal failure at the Olabisi Onabanjo university teaching hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria

  • C Olutayo Alebiosu Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, PO Box 4622, Dugbe Post Office, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
  • Olugbenga O Ayodele
  • Adigun Abbas
  • A Ina Olutoyin
Keywords: Chronic Renal Failure, Retrospective Study, Nigeria

Abstract

Background and objectives of the study: Chronic kidney disease is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. This study aims at determining the pattern of chronic renal failure (CRF) in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital.

Methods: The study was a 10-year retrospective study of consecutive cases of CRF seen at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria.

Results: The frequency of CRF in the population was 3.6% (182 of 5,107). There were 90 males and 63 females (1.42:1). The peak age was between 20-49 years, with a mean of 39.6+14.8 (range 14 -72years). The commonest causes were chronic glomerulonephritis 63(41.2%), hypertensive nephrosclerosis 40(26.1%) and diabetes mellitus 20(13.1%). The commonest symptoms were oedema, vomiting, oliguria and dyspnea occurring at 118(77.1%), 96(62.7%), 89(58.2%) and 87(56.9%) respectively. The mean creatinine clearance value at presentation was 6.5+8.1mls/min, while the commonest complications were hypertension 68 (44.4%), biventricular failure 32 (20.9%) and urinary tract infection 29 (19%). The mean presenting systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 167.34+37.6mmHg and 106.03+28.9 mmHg respectively. The mean total haemodialysis session per patient was 3.5+1.6 (range 1- 7sessions). Only 34(22.2%) of the patients were able to afford haemodialysis. The majority 21(61.8%) of these could only afford 3 haemodialysis sessions while only 2(5.9%) patients had up to 7 dialysis sessions in the center.

Conclusion: Chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertensive nephrosclerosis and diabetes mellitus are the commonest causes of chronic renal failure in Nigeria. Most of the patients presented late. Cardiovascular complications and infections were responsible for a greater morbidity among the patients.

African Health Sciences Vol. 6(3) 2006: 132-138
Published
2006-11-21
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1680-6905