Estimation of preferred water flow parameters for four species of Simulium (Diptera: Simuliidae) in small clear streams in South Africa

  • Nicholas A Rivers-Moore Institute for Water Research, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa; current address: KZN Wildlife, PO Box 13053, Cascades 3202, South Africa
  • Ferdinand C de Moor Albany Museum (Department of Freshwater Invertebrates, Makana Biodiversity Centre) and Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa
  • Sharon A Birkholz Institute for Water Research, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa; current address: KZN Wildlife, PO Box 13053, Cascades 3202, South Africa
  • Robert W Palmer Nepid Consultants, PO Box 4349, White River 1240, South Africa

Abstract

Blackfly larvae typically occur in fast-flowing riffle sections of rivers, with different blackfly species showing preferences for different hydraulic conditions. Very little quantitative data exist on hydraulic conditions linked to the blackfly species occurring in South African streams. Stones-in-current biotopes (i.e. fast riffle flows over cobbles) were sampled from four sites in three small clear streams in the Eastern and Western Cape provinces of South Africa. Mean water column velocities at each sampled stone were measured using a mini current meter, while flow velocities closer to the boundary layer where blackfly larvae occurred were estimated using indirect techniques (standard hemispheres and aerating tablets). Standard hemispheres were also used to calculate more complex hydraulic parameters such as Froude and Reynolds numbers. Four species of Simuliid were sampled in sufficient numbers to show trends in flow velocity preferences. Simulium impukane and S. rutherfoordi both occurred at their highest densities at velocities of 0.3m s–1, while S. merops preferred velocities of 0.7m s–1. Simulium nigritarse SL attained the highest densities of all the blackfly species sampled, and its relative abundances were greatest at velocities of 0.8–0.9m s–1. Within the streams surveyed, all blackfly species occurred in subcritical-turbulent flows — based on a classification using Froude and Reynolds numbers — although two of the species were also found in high densities in supercritical flows where these existed at the sites. Local hydraulics within the stones-in-current biotope are complex, but in the absence of fine-scale equipment for measuring micro-velocities, standard hemispheres are a useful, cost-effective technique for the initial quantification of hydraulic parameters in small, clear streams. Such an approach facilitates further understanding of links between hydraulics and aquatic invertebrates in South African streams.

Keywords: aerating tablets; blackfly; flow velocity; Froude number; hydraulics; Reynolds number; standard hemispheres

African Journal of Aquatic Science 2006, 31(2): 261–269
Published
2006-12-04
Section
Articles

eISSN: 1727-9364