Survivability of probiotics in symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt

  • Xue Han
  • Lanwei Zhang
  • MR Guo
Keywords: Buffalo milk, symbiotic yogurt, refrigerated storage, probiotic survivability, physicochemical properties.

Abstract

In present study, symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt prototypes (plain and blueberry) were developed using a commercial starter containing probiotics. Samples were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological properties, and the survivability of probiotics during 10 weeks of storage. Gross composition results were: total solids 11.60 ± 0.58 and 17.12 ± 0.36%, ash 0.82 ± 0.06 and 0.78 ± 0.02%, protein 4.49 ± 0.31 and 4.16 ± 0.11%, fat 0.68 ± 0.03 and 0.55 ± 0.05%, carbohydrates 5.68 ± 0.18 and 11.38 ± 0.18% for plain and blueberry flavored samples, respectively. Mineral contents (mg/g) were: Calcium 1.97 ± 0.20 and 1.72 ± 0.06, magnesium 1.63 ± 0.02 and 1.69 ± 0.01, zinc 0.07 ± 0.01 and 0.07 ± 0.00, sodium 0.87 ± 0.15 and 0.94 ± 0.12 for the plain and blueberry flavored yogurt respectively. The values of pH, titratable acidity and viscosity ranged from 4.34 to 4.01 and 4.42 to 3.70, 0.96 to 1.13% and 0.94 to 1.30%, 1.40 to 1.67 and 2.15 to 1.56 Pa.s for the plain and blueberry flavored yogurts respectively. The initial population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus casei were above 108 CFU/g for both the plain and blueberry flavored yogurts. Lactobacillus acidophilus was viable only for the first two weeks; however, Bifidobacterium spp and L. casei remained viable (>106 CFU/g) during the storage. The results indicate that the low fat buffalo milk yogurt is a good vehicle for developing symbiotic yogurt.

Key words: Buffalo milk, symbiotic yogurt, refrigerated storage, probiotic survivability, physicochemical properties.

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eISSN: 1684-5315