Pattern of rural-urban acquisition of pfcrt T76 allele among Nigerian children with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

  • Y A Olukosi Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos P.M.B. 12003 Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria
  • B A Iwalokun Department of Biochemistry, Lagos State University P.M.B. 1087 Apapa – Lagos, Nigeria
  • E O Magbagbeola Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos P.M.B. 12003 Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria
  • O Akinwande Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos P.M.B. 12003 Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria
  • T A Adewole Department of Biochemistry, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR) 6, Edmund Crescent Street P.M.B. 2016, Yaba Lagos – Nigeria
  • P U Agomo Department of Biochemistry, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR) 6, Edmund Crescent Street P.M.B. 2016, Yaba Lagos – Nigeria
Keywords: pfcrt T76 mutation, Plasmodium falciparum malaria, chloroquine resistance, Nigerian children

Abstract

Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum remains a public health problem in Nigerian children with treatment complicated by expansion of chloroquine resistant strains known to harbour a common K76T point mutation in their pfcrt alleles. Here, we report the outcome of a 2 – year (March 2000 – February 2002) molecular surveillance for pfcrtT76 in children aged 6 months – 13 years with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in rural and urban Lagos, Nigeria. Rural-urban pfcrtT76 acquisition of 48.7 vs. 73.7% and 67.3 vs. 74.6% due to monoclonal and polyclonal P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were found in the two study years, suggesting unstable but increasing prevalence of pfcrt T76 allele acquisition in the rural area. Further analyses showed that acquisition of pfcrtT76 allele was independent of sex but occurred more in ≤ 5 – year old children than older children in both populations. The impacts of K76T mutation in pfcrt gene and immunity on the clinical efficacy of chloroquine against acute uncomplicated malaria are discussed.

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 4 (4), pp. 361-366, 2005
Published
2005-08-16
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1684-5315