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African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences

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Physiological profiles of South African soccer referees and assistant referees

L Lategan, K Bahdur, AJJ Lombard

Abstract


Referees are important role-players in soccer matches. The physical fitness of referees influences their optimal positioning throughout the game. The aim of this research was to determine the physiological profiles of South African referees and assistant referees and to determine the intensities that they are required to work at during matches by looking at their match heart rate variables. Referees (N=7) and assistant referees (N=13) who were on the national panel underwent body composition, flexibility, core stability, aerobic endurance, agility, acceleration, speed and anaerobic testing. The results of the study showed that no significant differences existed between the referees and assistant referees for the fitness field tests. The VO2max values fell slightly below the average range found in literature indicating that referees in this study were slightly less aerobically fit than their international counterparts. The HRmax fell within the range of previously reported researches, and the HR results obtained from the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test mimicked the results of the age-predicted HRmax calculation method.

Keywords: Soccer, referee, fitness, body composition, flexibility, core stability, aerobic capacity, intensity.

Errata: In AJPHERD Vol. 17(4:1), December 2011, pages 675-693, an article titled, “Physiological profiles of South African soccer referees and assistant referees” was published. AJPHERD has now been informed that apart from the lead author, Leon Lategan the following two co-authors are associated with the article: K. Bahdur (Department of Sport and Movement Studies, University of Johannesburg, South Africa) and A.J.J. Lombard (Department of Sport and Movement Studies, University of Johannesburg, South Africa). This error is regretted.




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