The good shepherd: remedying the fencing syndrome

  • Monique Salomon
  • Clement Cupido
  • Igshaan Samuels

Abstract

In this paper the use of fenced grazing camps to manage the rangeland commons is challenged. A historical perspective is presented on fencing and rotational grazing in South Africa. Two case studies in KwaZulu-Natal and the Northern Cape illustrate the factors that influence the management of rangelands under communal land tenure without the use of fences. It is argued that herding is preferred over fencing. The reintroduction of herding could reap multiple benefits such as improving rural livelihoods, reviving customary practice, reducing stock theft, reducing predation and improving biodiversity management. The paper concludes with some issues for consideration when implementing herding as a multipurpose strategy for improved rural livelihoods and sustainable management of natural resources.

Keywords: communal rangelands, herding, local ecological knowledge, rangeland condition, South Africa

African Journal of Range & Forage Science 2013, 30(1&2): 71–75

Author Biographies

Monique Salomon
Farmer Support Group, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209, South Africa
Clement Cupido
Agricultural Research Council–Animal Production Institute, c/o Department of Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa
Igshaan Samuels
Agricultural Research Council–Animal Production Institute, c/o Department of Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa
Published
2013-07-09
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1727-9380
print ISSN: 1022-0119