Standard Heterosis for Grain Yield and Yield Related Traits in Maize (Zea mays L.) Inbred Lines in Haramaya District, Eastern Ethiopia

  • Woldu Mogesse School of Plant Sciences
  • Habtamu Zelleke School of Plant Sciences
  • Mandefro Nigussie Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)
Keywords: Crosses; F1 hybrids; Maturity; Standard checks.

Abstract

Determination of heterosis in maize hybrids is necessary for identification of superior F1 hybrids for breeding programs. Therefore, this study was conducted to estimate the amount of standard heterosis for grain yield and related traits in order to identify potential hybrid for future breeding schemes. Eight maize inbred lines were mated through a half diallel mating design (Griffing’s Method IV, Model I). The resulting twenty-eight F1
hybrids along with two standard checks (BHQPY 545 and MH 138) were evaluated using Alpha-Lattice Design with three replications during 2017/18 main cropping season at Haramaya University Research Site (Raare). Analysis of variance revealed significant variations for all traits indicating the existence of genetic variability. The result of heterosis estimation showed considerable amount of positive and negative heterosis for all traits
studied. The highest percentage of standard heterosis for grain yield was manifested by the cross combinations L3 × L6 over BHQPY 545, and L3 × L6, L3 × L8, L2 × L5, L6 × L8, L1 × L4, L4 × L6 and L3×L4 over MH138 (greater than 20% yield advantage). The maximum positive and significant standard heterosis was recorded for L3 × L6, and L1 × L4 for 1000 kernel weight and number of kernels per row, respectively over the two checks BHQPY-545 and MH-138. The observed highest heterosis for grain yield and related traits indicated the possibility of increasing yield by exploiting heterotic potential of maize genotypes. The information generated by this study could be useful for researchers who need to develop high yielding maize hybrids. Hence the potential hybrids could be recommended for commercial use, after verifying the results by repeating the research over years and across locations.

Author Biographies

Woldu Mogesse, School of Plant Sciences

School of Plant Sciences, Haramaya University, P. O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.

Habtamu Zelleke , School of Plant Sciences

School of Plant Sciences, Haramaya University, P. O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia

Mandefro Nigussie , Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Published
2020-09-17

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1992-0407