PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH

Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

Remember me or Register



Effect of Households’ Socio-Economic Condition on Crowding in Government-Built Apartments in Lagos, Nigeria

AK Adebayo, ACO Iweka

Abstract


This study evaluated how occupants’socio-economic status affect household crowding in multifamily walk-up apartments built by the government for low and medium income dwellers in Lagos, Nigeria. The focus was on Lagos State Development and Property Corporation (LSDPC) as a case study, using survey research design approach. Four large housing estates with a population of 7,764 dwelling units were purposively chosen from locations at Abesan, Iba, Ikoyi and Ebute-Metta. A sample of 7.5% (582) was selected, using systematic and stratification techniques. Pre-tested questionnaires were used to obtain responses from household heads pertaining to number of persons and demographic data for each housing unit. A return rate of 30.2% was recorded. Socio-economic grouping of households was derived using a monthly income estimate for the head of household. Households were grouped into low, medium and high income categories. Data analysis was done by applying adult-equivalent number of occupants to the Canadian National Occupancy Standards (CNOS) and the Equivalized Crowding Index (ECI). The results indicate a preponderance of gentrification, with attendant policy implications. The results also show that there is no significant difference in the degree of crowding among the different socio-economic classifications. This is inconsistent with the generally held understanding in urban housing studies that crowding rates are higher in low income households than in medium and high income households. The findings tend to suggest that LSDPC should adopt appropriate strategies to forestall the disappearance of low income households from its multifamily apartments.


Key words: Apartments, Crowding, Household, Housing Estates, Socio-economic Status




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejesm.v6i4.11
AJOL African Journals Online