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Global Journal of Medical Sciences

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Prevalance of Alcohol Abuse in Calabar South Local Government Areas Cross River State

NC Osuchukwu, EC Osuchukwu

Abstract


This study examined the prevalence of alcohol abuse in Calabar South, Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. Unlike earlier studies of alcohol use in Nigeria, the study focused on a segment of the population that is difficult to reach and probably at high risk of alcohol and drug abuse. In addition, the focus of this study was on both western and the traditional alcohol beverages. The sample consisted of 400 respondents aged 10-50 years resident in Calabar South. Life time consumption of alcohol was reported by 98.5% of the respondents. Beer was the most often consume alcoholic drinks in the study population by the male while wine was for female, 64% of males took beer while 36% of females took wine. the odds of taking alcoholic drink increased with age. The consumption of alcohol was described as very harmful to health by 48% of the sample Analysis of the data showed that the factors that mostly influenced alcohol drinking were its availability which stood at 52.75%, peer groups influenced 27.25%, mass media advent 7.5%, home 9.5% and school 3.0%. The study also showed that alcohol consumption had effect on the social behaviour of the people of Calabar South. Decreased work performance 77.25%, increase in violence and crime 77%, poverty 50.75%, wife and childbearing 73.75%, increase in accident rate 80.5%, children inability to continue schooling 83.5% Nigerian culture, it appears that there is a culture of alcohol implicitly institutionalized that one could easily brand it as a norm to drink alcohol across the whole social spectrum with the student population constituting a significant proportion of the risk group (Ifeagwazi,2007).



http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjms.v10i1-2.5
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