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Resolute large scale mining company contribution to health services of Lusu ward, a rural community, in Nzega district, Tabora region, Tanzania.

Mariam R Mavura, Jacqueline L. Bundala, Richard K. Arap Towett, Fariji D Mtango

Abstract


Introduction: In 1995 Tanzanian Government reformed the mining industry and the new policy allowed an involvement of multinational companies but the communities living near new large scale gold mines were expected to benefit from the industry in terms of socio economic, health, education, employment, safe drinking water, irrigation, livestock and agriculture, better shelter, and environmental protection. Objective was to assess the contribution of one of the corporate mining companies in Tanzania as a social responsibiliy towards surrounding rural communities of Lusu Ward, Nzega District, Tabora Region , Tanzania
Methodology: The study employed a case study approach using a questionnaire to a random and purposive sample of 200 households. The questionnaire was administered to the 200 household heads and 16 community leaders. The data were analyzed using Scientific Package for Social Science (SPSS).
Results: There was evidence that the company (RSL) had brought about social changes to the community in the form of improvement in housing (mud bricks houses roofed with grass for 74.% of the households and mud bricks houses roofed with iron sheets for 26%. There were also improvements in agriculture whereby mixed farming together with livestock had risen to 44% of respondents, a dispensary and one biogas plant were built and free drugs were provided to one dispensary. The mine employed only 0.9% of the community. RSL also supported an HIV screening survey in of the villages. The prevalence of communicable diseases, however, appeared unaffected and HIV prevalence was higher than national average in females (11%) in males (7%) and among mining workers (9%).
Conclusions: The RSL has made significant contributions to the wellbeing of surrounding communities, however, health problems are very big and more is needed to be done.
Recommendations: The policy should state clearly what the large scale mining companies should contribute to the community




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