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Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management

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Level of Radiofrequency (RF) Radiations from GSM Base Stations and its Biological Effects on Albino Mice, Mus musculus

AA Otitoloju, VO Osunkalu, IA Obe, OA Adewale, OR Akinde

Abstract


Levels of radiofrequency radiations around two global systems for mobile communication (GSM) base stations located in the vicinity of a residential quarter and workplace complex were measured. The effects of the radiofrequency radiations on albino mice placed in exposure cages and located around the base stations over a six months period were carried out. The levels of radiofrequency (RF) radiations around the base stations were found to be between 488.51mV/m to 625.49mV/m compared to 59 mV/m in control stations. The results of the weight change experiment showed that over the 180 days of observation, there was weight gain in the exposed and control mice groups. Statistical comparisons of mean weight changes between exposed mice and control mice showed that there were no significant (P>0.05) differences between the weight of the test animals. The hematological studies revealed an elevation of white blood cell (WBC) counts in mice exposed to RF radiations compared to control group. There was however no significant (P>0.05) difference between the red blood cell counts in the exposed and control mice. There was also no significant (P>0.05) difference in the hemoglobin and glucose levels in the blood of both exposed and control mice groups. The red blood cells in exposed mice were however found to contain a higher number of macrocytes, poikilocytes, polychromatic cells and fewer target cells than the control mice. Histological studies of the heart and kidney of exposed mice showed only slight tissues deformities in kidneys of exposed mice compared to control. The relevance of these findings in setting radiofrequency radiation exposure guidelines and the need for more studies with widely varying biological parameters is very necessary as Nigeria leaps further into the communication age.



http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jasem.v14i3.68391
AJOL African Journals Online