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Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care

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Willingness To Seek Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Voluntary Counselling And Testing (VCT) Among Urban Residents in Osogbo, South-West Nigeria

PS Ogunro, AK Adeneye, PO Akinwusi, TO Ogungbamigbe

Abstract


Background/Objective: Sub-Saharan Africa is home to two-thirds of all people living with HIV/AIDS. Nigeria has the third highest population of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) is rapidly becoming an important component of HIV/AIDS prevention and care strategy. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and perception of HIV/AIDS and the factors that may affect willingness to seek VCT among residents of an urban community in Nigeria. Methodology:  A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in Osogbo, Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were used to gather information from 332 residents. A multistage sampling technique was used for the selection of respondents. A total of 350 houses were selected from the 26 wards. Results: A high proportion (97.6%) of the respondents confirmed that they have heard of HIV/AIDS, 91.1% believed that AIDS is real. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS by the respondents was related to their level of educational attainment and their professions. Only 28.4% of the respondents are aware of VCT, but (66.9%) were willing to seek VCT services if the services are available; 66.7% confirmed that they would go ahead even if a fee is attached. However, 47.2% of those that think otherwise are scare of confidentiality, stigmatization and lack of fund. Willingness was also related to level of educational attainment, professionalism and age group. Conclusion: Programme managers should ensure that councillors have good knowledge on how to alleviate the fear of clients. Counselling should be the first step and if necessary test should follow.

Journal of Community Medicine & Primary Health vol 23 (1-2) 2011



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