Notes on the ecology and status of some forest mammals in four Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania

  • Norbert J Cordeiro Department of Biological Sciences (mc 066), University of Illinois Chicago, IL 60607-7060, USA Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute PO Box 661, Arusha,
  • Nathalie Seddon Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
  • David R Capper Environmental Policy Department, Foreign & Commonwealth Office King Charles Street, London, SW1A 2AH, UK
  • Jonathan MM Ekstrom BirdLife International Wellbrook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge, UK
  • Kim M Howell Department of Zoology & Marine Biology, University of Dar es Salaam P.O.Box 35064, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
  • Isabel S Isherwood Tomsteads, Woodland, Broughton-in-Furness, Cumbria, LA20 6DG, UK
  • Charles AM Msuya Department of Zoology & Marine Biology, University of Dar es Salaam P.O.Box 35064, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
  • Jonas T Mushi Kilimanjaro Catchment Forest Office, P.O. Box 1826, Moshi, Tanzania
  • Andrew W Perkin Nocturnal Primate Research Group, Anthropology Department Social Sciences and Law, Oxford Brookes University Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
  • Robert G Pople BirdLife International Wellbrook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge, UK
  • William T Stanley Division of Mammals, Field Museum of Natural History 1400 S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA

Abstract

From 1993 to 2000, observations were made of small to medium-sized mammals in seven poorly known submontane forest reserves and one village forest in the North Pare, South Pare, East Usambara and Nguu Mountains, Tanzania. Of 26 species recorded, three are Red-Listed as Threatened (Endangered: Zanj elephant shrew Rhynchocyon petersi; Vulnerable: red-bellied coast squirrel Paraxerus palliates, and eastern tree hyrax Dendrohyrax validus) and five as Lower Risk (two dwarf galagos Galagoides spp., African buffalo Syncerus caffer, suni Neotragus moschatus, and Harvey's duiker Cephalophus harveyi). Most of our mammal records represent new distributions in the Eastern Arc Mountains, and one record of an unidentified squirrel in the Nguu Mountains is of conservation interest. Together with timber removal and cultivation, hunting appears to threaten the survival of mammals in these forests. There is an urgent need to establish long-term conservation programmes in these forests and more thorough surveys of mammals are necessary.

Journal of East African Natural History Vol. 94(1) 2005: 175-189
Published
2006-09-14
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1026-1613
print ISSN: 0012-8317