The suitability of locally produced milk for human consumption: Investigations into quantity, composition and quality profiles of milk at Njoro, Kenya

  • P.G. Bille University of Naminia, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Department of Food Science and Technology, P/Bag 13301, Windhoek Namibia.
  • M. Ahamed Egerton University, Department of Dairy and Food Technology, P.O. Box 536, Njoro - Kenya
  • V. Othiambo Egerton University, Department of Dairy and Food Technology, P.O. Box 536, Njoro - Kenya
  • E.L. Keya Egerton University, Department of Dairy and Food Technology, P.O. Box 536, Njoro - Kenya

Abstract



The basic premise of this paper is that the supply of milk and milk products from the Guildford Dairy Institute (GDI) at Egerton University (EU) in Kenya decreased drastically over the recent past as a result of a nearly six-fold increase in the human population in the area. A drop of 40 % of milk production from the university farms also added more impetus to the study. These developments resulted in a significant shortfall of milk to the GDI factory for processing and for sale to the university and surrounding communities. The results of the study carried out at some randomly selected neighbouring farms as possible source of additional milk to GDI factory showed 3.8 ± 0.5 % BF, 12.6 ± 0.8 % TS, 0.16 ± 0.02 LA, 1.029 ± 0.003 Sp Gr; - 0.55 ± 0.02 Fr Pt; 0.03 ± 0.004 Fg Pb and 0.04 ± 0.003 ppm Hg and sensory results indicated 'Liked Moderately' for all samples, which were within the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KBS) guidelines. Milk was available but the logistics to collect and pay for the milk need to be put in place.

The Journal of Food Technology in Africa Volume 6 Number 2 (April-June 2001), pp. 41-43
Published
2004-06-22
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1028-6098