Imperialism and Loss of Identity in Second Hand Clothes: The Nigerian Okrika Experience

  • Mohammed Abubakar Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Joseph Adesoji Oluyemi Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Raji Abdulateef Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Atolagbe Emmanuel Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Joseph Adejoke Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Bowen University, Nigeria
  • Taiwo Motolani Williams Department of Education, Babcock University, Nigeria.

Abstract

The use second hand clothes in Nigerian have been around for decades. Among other benefits it provides is clothing for those who cannot afford to buy new ones and employment opportunities for the teeming population. However, the use of second hand clothes by many Nigerians seems to have eroded the rich cultural heritage of traditional dress culture which hitherto existed among many cultures and societies in the country. It has also paved way for imperialism by former colonial masters thereby, making Nigerians to succumb to pressures dictated by fashion, civilization, modernity, necessity, and survival instinct. This has further helped to forge a relationship of dependency on the West and in many ways preventing Nigeria from developing in many ramifications. This study explores the factors responsible for the continuous use of second hand clothes by Nigerians and the measures that could be put in place to ensure that this problem is addressed. Some of the measures suggested in the paper to forestalling the use of second hand clothes in Nigeria include: enforcing the law prohibiting second hand clothes in the country, import substitution, leadership by example, reducing the prevailing poverty rate and cultivating the spirit of patriotism.

 

Keywords: Poverty, Employment Opportunities, Brand Names, Affordability, Durability, Import Substitution, Patriotism.

 

 

Author Biographies

Mohammed Abubakar, Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
MOHAMMED Abubakar Yinusa is an Associate Professor and Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His area of specialization is Sociology of Development and Social Problems. He has several publications and has attended various conferences both locally and internationally
Joseph Adesoji Oluyemi, Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
JOSEPH Adesoji Oluyemi is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His areas of specialization include Medical Sociology and Sociology of Development with special interests in Adolescent Health, Occupational health, Infectious diseases, Emerging diseases, Sexualities and issues in development
Raji Abdulateef, Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
RAJI Abdulateef is a PhD student and lecturer II in the Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His areas of specialization include Sociology of Development, Rural Sociology and Social issues.
Atolagbe Emmanuel, Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
ATOLAGBE Emmanuel is a facilitator at the National Open University of Nigeria. He is currently running his PhD programme in Sociology at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria with specialization in medical Sociology. He has interest in industrial relations, industrial sociology, peace studies and intergroup relations and has several publications.
Joseph Adejoke, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Bowen University, Nigeria
JOSEPH Adejoke is a Consultant Clinical Microbiologist and Infectious Disease Physician. She is a Lecturer in the Department of Medical Microbiology at University of Medical Sciences, Ondo State Nigeria. Her area of specialization is in Sexually Transmitted infection especially with people living with HIV.
Taiwo Motolani Williams, Department of Education, Babcock University, Nigeria.
WILLIAMS Motolani Taiwo is a Senior Lecturer in the department of Education, Babcock University, Ogun State, Nigeria. She has a PhD degree in Counselling Psychology.
Published
2018-05-08

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1998-1279