FARMERS-HERDSMEN CRISIS AND TENDENCY TO MIGRATE AMONG FARMERS IN IBARAPA NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA, OYO STATE, NIGERIA

  • F.M. Ibrahim Department of Agricultural Extension and Management, Federal College of Forestry, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, PMB 5087, Jericho Hills, Ibadan, Nigeria
Keywords: Farmers-herders Crisis, Migration, First-hand experiences, and Hearsay

Abstract

The upsurge of farmer-herdsmen crisis accentuates the challenge of rural-urban migration. This migration can be
beneficial or inimical to agricultural productivity. The study was designed to examine farmer's experience of
farmer-herdsmen crisis and tendency to migrate because of this. Closed-ended questionnaire were administered
via structured interview to collect primary data among 266 respondents selected using a multi-stage sampling
procedure. One-way ANOVA, independent sample T test, Eta and Eta2 were among statistical techniques used to
analyze data. Results shows that 89.1%, 62.4%, and 48.9% of respondents knew at least one person who was
physically molested, threatened to be killed, and maimed respectively. Respondents who indicated people were
sexually molested and killed were 32% and 36.5% respectively. Respondents who also indicated that farmproduce
were eaten by cows (98.1%), planted crops were uprooted (98.9%) and stepped on (98.5%) were very
common. Tendency to migrate was high among 50.8% of respondents. Sex, age, education and marital status had
no significant effect on tendency to migrate (p> 0.05) but religion did (p< 0.05). Life-threatening/damaging
experiences, including knowledge of at least one person who was physically molested (p< 0.05); threatened to be
killed (p< 0.05); sexually molested (p< 0.05) and killed (p< 0.05) significantly predisposed respondents to higher
tendency to migrate. However, knowledge of who was maimed (p> 0.05); whose farm-produce were eaten by
cows (p> 0.05); planted crops were uprooted (p> 0.05) and stepped on (p> 0.05) did not significantly predisposed
farmers to higher tendency to migrate. Being a Muslim is effectively more predisposing to migrating in the study
area. In addition to the apparent and gruesome loss of human lives and properties, the farmers-herders crisis is
strongly making communal social configuration repulsive to its manpower. Halting the crisis is valuable for
obvious reasons including checking the exodus of rural manpower.

Published
2020-04-30

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eISSN: 0300-368X