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Nnamdi Azikiwe University Journal of International Law and Jurisprudence

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Project Work by Students for First Degree: An Appraisal

SAM Ekwenze

Abstract


Curriculum experts world over expect that at the final year of study, every student must write a project. This is to assess the depth of knowledge, particularly the writing skill, acquired by the student. It is expected that after University education, student of law should write well as an academic, a solicitor/advocate or judge or write legal opinion(s) for an executive. In writing, there are standards and conventions. However, every area of writing has its peculiarities that distinguishe it from others. Legal writing specifically, should refer to cases in a given way, also to textbooks, journals, jurists and relevant opinion(s). To identify each student’s capability, topics should not be assigned to students collectively. This necessitates supervisors who are knowledgeably in the area of choice. The proper order, format and form for legal research and writing must be observed. Attention is paid to grammar, lexis and structure as well as the proper footnoting rather than end notes. Uniformity in writing style is always advocated and rewarded. It is the duty of the supervisor to identify copy right breaches. To curb this, Universities or the law faculties should have websites that will enable supervisors cross-check projects for originality. The essence of this work it to address these issues and make necessary recommendations.



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