The Impact of Multiple Role Strain, Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control on The Psychological Health of Working Mothers

  • K.A. Afolabi
  • A.I. Alarape

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of multiple role strain, self-efficacy and locus of control on the psychological health of working mothers. One hundred and ninety-nine working mothers participated in the study. A total of 175 (87.9%) were married, 20 (10.7%) were single, 2 (1.0%) were divorced and 2 (1.0%) were widowed. Results showed that working mothers who scored high on multiple role strain experienced significantly more anxiety than their counterpart who scored low on multiple role strain, F (1,190) = 35.34, P < .01; working mothers who scored low on self-efficacy experienced significant more anxiety than working mothers who scored high on self-efficacy, F (1,190) = 23.45, P < .01; and internally oriented working mothers experienced more anxiety (M=46.98) than their counterpart with external locus of control, F (1,190) = 9.84, P < .01. The three-way interaction was also significant, F (1,190) = 7.22, P <. 01. The main effects for multiple role strain and locus of control were not significant on depression F (1,190) = 0.61, ns; F (1,190) = 1.50, ns. Self-efficacy had a significant effect on depression F (1,190) = 10.86, P < .01. Working mothers who scored low on self-efficacy experienced significantly more depression than working mothers who scored high on self-efficacy. The multiple role strain X self-efficacy interaction term was also significant on depression. F (1,190) = 6.17, P < .05. Implications for promoting more healthful work environments and facilitating working mothers coping are discussed.

(Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: 7 (1&2): 1-16)
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Articles

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