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Nigerian Journal of Family Practice

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A comparative study of food consumption pattern among public and private primary school children in Ojodu Local Government Area, Lagos State, Nigeria

E.O. Amu, F.A. Olatona, S.A. Deji

Abstract


Introduction: Adequate nutrition in school age children is of paramount importance  to their health and plays a significant role in their growth and development. The  pattern of food consumption is a reflection of their nutrition.

Objective: The study assessed the food consumption pattern among primary school children in Ojodu Local Government Area, Lagos Nigeria.

Methodology: The study employed a cross-sectional descriptive design. A  pre-tested, interviewer-administered, structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from 206 pupils who were recruited by multi-stage sampling method from a public and two private primary schools in Ojodu Local Government Area (LGA), Lagos State, Nigeria. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Results: Majority of respondents consumed rice in both the public (63.1%) and  private (71.8%) schools. Those from the private schools significantly consumed more meat, fish, beans, bread, noodles and snacks; than those of their public school counterparts (p < 0.05). Majority of respondents in both public 50(48.5%) and private 46(44.7%) schools only consumed milk occasionally (p > 0.05).Majority of respondents in both public 78(75.7%) and private 75(72.8%) schools ate fruits either once a week or occasionally (p > 0.05). Majority of respondents in the public 78(75.7%) and private 81(78.6%) schools ate vegetables either once a week or
occasionally (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Pupils in private primary schools consumed more protein foods than those in the public schools. However pupils in both category of schools do not  consume enough milk, fruits and vegetables.




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