Community Based Study of the Influence of Social class on the Prevalence and Clinical Profile of Adolescent Facial Acne Vulgaris

  • Ehiaghe L. Anaba
  • Adebola O. Ogunbiyi
  • Adekunle O. George
Keywords: Acne vulgaris, adolescent, clinical profile, prevalence, severity, social class

Abstract

Background: Facial acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin in adolescents. In Nigeria, studies of the prevalence of  dolescent facial acne vulgaris, lesion type and distribution, and influence of social class on prevalence are few. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of adolescent facial acne vulgaris, clinical characteristics, and the influence of social class on this prevalence.

Methods: This was a community‑based cross‑sectional study. One thousand and seventy‑nine students from four secondary schools (two private and two public) were assessed. Students were clinically examined for facial acne vulgaris, and acne severity was graded. A structured questionnaire for sociodemographic variables was administered to the students. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.

Results: One thousand and seventy‑nine students were studied; 52% were male, and 47.9% were female. The students were aged 9–20 years with a mean age of 14 ± 2.1 years. The prevalence of facial acne vulgaris was found to be 53.2%. More females (56.7%) had acne than males (50%), the prevalence was found to increase from 28% in the 9–11 years age group to 71.1% in the 18–20 years age group and more prevalent in adolescents from the high social class (60.7%). The severity of acne was mild in 67.2%, moderate in 28.9%, and severe in 4.9%.

Conclusion: Prevalence of adolescent facial acne vulgaris increases with age, more prevalent in adolescents from a high social class. Male gender, age, a family history of acne, and previous treatment of acne contribute to the severity of acne.

Keywords: Acne vulgaris, adolescent, clinical profile, prevalence, severity, social class 

Published
2021-02-26
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2667-0526
print ISSN: 1115-2613