An assessment report on an immunization clinic located in a tertiary institution in Ibadan

  • AA Fatiregun
  • TO Alonge
  • A Rukewe
  • E Etukiren
  • U Chidinma
  • AM Adejugbagbe

Abstract

Objectives: The aims of the assessment report were to appraise immunization system components and review vaccination coverage between January 2007 and December 2011 at the University College Hospital (UCH) immunization clinic.
Methods: The immunization clinic has an annual target population of 997 (for children < one year of age) and 1246 (for pregnant women), which were used in this assessment. The data collection method used included; Key informant - interview, administration of a semi-structured  questionnaire, records review and observations during immunization sessions.
Results: The UCH immunization clinic mainly offers fixed sessions and only provides outreach services when there is a need, such as during outbreaks. However, there are no records of vaccinepreventable diseases being  monitored. The coverage rate for nearly all of the vaccines was greater than 100% of the estimated target population for the hospital. Except for the coverage rate of Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine, which peaked in 2011, other vaccines’ coverage peaked in 2009, after which there
was a decline. The highest dropout rate was recorded in 2007, while the rates between 2009 and 2010 were <10%, but the BCG and measles drop out rates were >10% for the 5-year period. For the adult immunizations, yellow fever recorded the highest coverage rate, while the lowest rate was recorded for tetanus toxoid dose 5 (TT5). The vaccines that were most often in short supply included Diphtheria-pertusis-tetanus, Hepatitis B,
yellow fever, oral polio, and cerebrospinal meningitis vaccines. Although good-quality supplies, equipment and consumables were observed, there was no inventory of these items. There were evident interpersonal communication and community mobilization as well as capacity building for staff.

Conclusion: The assessment showed there was progress in the provision and administration of immunization based on available resources. There is, however, the need to improve documentation of clinic activities.

Published
2014-06-19
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 0302-4660