Relationship between Malaria Vector Densities in Artificial Container Habitats, Land-Use Changes and Temperature

  • RI Okechukwu
  • JN Okereke
  • TIN Ezejiofor
  • KO Obasi
  • GO Ebere

Abstract

Urbanisation and land-use changes are believed to be responsible for the rising spread of mosquitoes across the country. Three distinctive study areas were used in this investigation, representing rural, semi-urban and urban areas in Owerri, Imo State. 30 eggs of Anopheles gambiae were bred evenly in six artificial containers, with their daily temperature recorded. There was speedy rate of development in the life stages of Anopheles sp in the urban area with its peak of complete metamorphosis occurring at the 7th day of the study whereas in the rural area, the peak of its complete metamorphosis occurred at the 12th day. Statistically, there existed significant differences between daily temperatures taken at the different study areas and also in the number of mosquito larvae becoming adult at the different study areas. This suggested however, that some factors associated with the urban areas may have facilitated the breeding rate of the Anopheles sp such as houses that radiate heat and other agents that cause global warming like emission of gases from vehicles. The study recommended residential houses to be built far away from commercial areas to avoid exposure to mosquito bites so that the control of mosquitoes may start from the urban areas.

Keywords: Malaria, Vectors, Anopheles mosquito, metamorphosis, global warming

Nigerian Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 32 [2] September 2011, pp. 283-286

Author Biographies

RI Okechukwu
Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri
JN Okereke
Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri
TIN Ezejiofor
Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri
KO Obasi
Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri
GO Ebere
Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri
Published
2014-01-13
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1117-4145