PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH

Nigerian Medical Practitioner

Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

Remember me or Register



DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access  DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access

Seroprevalence and co-infection of HIV, HBV and Syphilis among booked pregnant women at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital

O.T. Ojo, O.E. Jagun, M.U. Ikhile, P.O. Olatunji, B.Y. Bakare

Abstract


Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Syphilis share similar transmission routes including sexual, blood to blood contact, injecting drug usage and vertical transmission. Infections in pregnancy can result in adverse outcomes including vertical transmission and neonatal death. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence and co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and syphilis infections among pregnant women attending the antenatal facility of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH) Sagamu and the possible socio-demographic and packed cell volume (PCV) association. A retrospective study of pregnant women who booked at antenatal clinic in OOUTH, Sagamu over a period of one year was carried out. Socio-Demographic data and results of booking PCV, HIV, HBV and VDRL were obtained from the case record. A total of 373 apparently healthy pregnant women aged between 16 and 42years (30 ±4.5 years) was studied, 91.1% were from monogamous family while 8.3% were from polygamous family. 15.8%, 33% and 51.2% had primary, secondary and tertiary education respectively. The overall seroprevalence of HIV, HBV and syphilis were found to be 10.7%, 7.2% and 1.6% respectively. Rate of co-infection of HIV and HBV was 22.2%, there was no co-infection between HIV and syphilis or HBV and syphilis respectively. In this study a higher prevalence of HIV was found among women from polygamous family and the prevalence of HIV, HBV and syphilis infection declined with increasing level of education.

Keywords: HIV, HBV, syphilis, Pregnant women




AJOL African Journals Online