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Nigerian Medical Practitioner

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The Epidemiology, Possible Risk Factors and Clinical Presentation of Pterygium at the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria

TO Otulana

Abstract


development of pterygium. This is a hospital based retrospective review of patients diagnosed to have pterygium at the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital in Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria between January 2006 and December 2009. Data was obtained from the case files of patients. The age, sex, place of abode, occupation, level of education, pattern of presentation and type of treatment offered were recorded and analyzed. Two hundred and thirty-three patients were diagnosed to have pterygium within the 3 years study period but only 178 case notes were retrieved. Age range was between 8 years and 85years with a mean of 50.9years ±15.6 standard deviation. Pterygium was most common in the age group 41-60years. There was a male: female ratio of 1:1.8. Ninety-four (52.8%) of the patients were traders, 10 were students, 8 were teachers while 4 were farmers. Sixty (33.7%) patients presented because there was growth in their eyes while 44 complained of redness. One hundred and twenty-nine (72.5%) patients had bilateral pterygia while 49 (27.5%) were unilateral cases. One hundred and eight (60.7%) had bilateral nasal lesion and same number (129) of patients came with a presenting visual acuity of 6/18 and better. Seventy-eight patients (43.8%) were treated conservatively with eye drops while 39 (21.9%) had excision with adjuvant 5 fluorouracil [FU]. Bilaterality and preponderance of female gender are important findings in this study. The perceived presence of pterygium was a predominant reason for seeking eye care.

Keywords: Epidemiology, Risk factors, Clinical presentation, pterygium, Nigeria

Nigerian Medical Practitioner Vol. 63 No 1-2, 2013



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