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Nigerian Veterinary Journal

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Effects of molasses or molavit supplementation on the rectal temperature, live weight gain and haematology of cockerels during the harmattan season in nothern Nigeria.

A Fayomi, N S Minka, J O Ayo, J A Nwanta, A Mohammed, E J Alaya

Abstract




The effects of molasses or molavit supplementation on the rectal temperature, live weight gain and haematology of cockerels during the harmattan season in Northern Nigeria were investigated. A total of 120 hybrid cockerels aged 8 weeks old were used for the study. The cockerels were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups of 40 birds each, with each group having the same number of replicates. Group A was supplemented with 5mls/litre in drinking water; Group B with 5ml / litter also in drinking water, while group C was given only water and this served as the control. The molasses or molavit was administered for 5 days period after every 7 days for a period of 7 weeks. The experiment lasted for seven (7) weeks. The results obtained showed that the mean rectal temperature (RT) value of 41.30C ± 0.12 recorded from group C cockerels was significantly (P <0.05) higher than the values of 40.9 ± 0.11 and 40.8 ± 0.110C recorded from group A and B cockerels respectively. The haematological result showed significant (P<0.05) hemoglobin and leukocyte counts in control group C than the values recorded from groups A and B. Also, the percent live weight gain for groups A, B and C were 100 ± 1.5, 133 ± 2.8 and 79.7 ± 1.2%respectively from their initial weights. The result indicated that molasses or molavit ameliorated the effect of stressful harmattan season by reducing the RT and the haematological values of the cockerels. It is concluded that molavit or molasses increased the live weight gains of the cockerels and also combated the stressful effect of harmattan. .

Keywords: Effects, Molasses, Molavit, Cockerels, Haematology

Nigerian Veterinary Journal Vol. 28 (1) 2007 pp. 34-40



http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/nvj.v28i1.3541
AJOL African Journals Online