Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Of Intracranial Glioma In A Tiger-Boxer Breed Dog With Seizures

  • R Gonul
  • A Kayar
  • L Koenhemsi
  • M Ermanor
Keywords: MRI, Seizure, Dogs, Brain, Tumor

Abstract



Seizures are widespread neurological anomalies observed in dogs and as understood, tumor localization is one of the most important factors related to the development of seizures (Bush et al., 2002). Seizures can be seen as reactive epileptic episodes from extracranial sources such as metabolic disorders and toxications or from intracranial diseases such as primary epilepsy, encephalitis, neoplasia, degeneration, malformation and trauma that are from idiopathic sources (Oliver and Lorenz, 1993; Aslan, 1998; Bush et al., 2002). Seizures are commonly a widespread reflection of various intracranial physiological anomalies (Oliver and Lorenz, 1993; Bagley and Gavin, 1998 and Bush et al., 2002). Seizures can occur as focal or generalized, but can also be the single symptom of intracranial tumors (Oliver and Lorenz, 1993; Bagley and Gavin, 1998; LeCouteur, 2001 and Taylor, 2003). Seizures seen in dogs with a brain tumor are evidences that indicative of an underlying structural brain disease (Oliver and Lorenz, 1993; Bagley and Gavin, 1998 and LeCouteur, 2001). Tumor localization is one of the most important factors related to the development of seizures (Bagley and Gavin, 1998; Lipsitz et al., 2003). Seizures are commonly related to tumors that involve the cerebral hemispheres and the diencephalons (forebrain or the supratentorial structures). However, some seizures are related to the frontal lobes, olfactory zone, parietal lobes or brain stem (Bagley and Gavin, 1998). Developed imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) or MRI are required to diagnose and determine the structural anomalies of these tumors (Bagley and Gavin, 1998; Bush et al., 2002; Lipsitz et al., 2003; McConnell et al., 2004 and Ohlerth and Scharf, 2006). In the light of this information, we studied the brain of a dog with a suspicious cranial neoplasia that was referred to our clinic due to complaints of seizures. In the MRI studies, it was concluded that the causes of epileptoid seizures was due to neoplastic process suggestive of an existing primary glial neoplasm.

Keywords: MRI, Seizure, Dogs, Brain, Tumor

Nigerian Veterinary Journal Vol. 28 (2) 2007 pp. 53-56
Published
2008-05-09
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 0331-3026