The philosophical concept of “Ubuntu” as dialogic ethic and the transformation of political community in Africa

  • Jude Chinweuba Asike

Abstract

This work evaluates the fundamental questions of classical ethics on the possibility of forms of community which are simultaneously more universalistic and more sensitive to cultural differences. The finding of this paper supports the thesis that universalism remain an ethical ideal on which the African state remain viable to trans-cultural or dialogic ethical relationship within the space of modernity. The transformation of an African communities, kingdoms and empires prior to modernity was rejuvenated in the concept of “Ubuntu”, but with the emergence of modernity as reorganization of institutions and social conditions of state in Africa, it confronted each other as geopolitical rivals in the condition of anarchy. Thus, it is on a related note, that globalization with its dialogic ethic would be encouraged to approximate the normative ideal of a universal communication community in African states. Globalization significantly, creates the possibility of forms of community which are simultaneously more universalistic and more sensitive to cultural differences. It is only when the African political community cultivates the spirit of responsible and common citizenship that it is able to sustain its unity and diversity. The paper establishes that, „Ubuntu‟ as a set of interrelated concepts appears to invoke the spirit of oneness among cultures in Africa.
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eISSN: 1597-474X