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Pan African Medical Journal

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Snakebite in bedroom kills a physician in Cameroon: a case report

Armand Nkwescheu, Leopold Cyriaque Donfack Mbasso, Franky Baonga Ba Pouth, Anastase Dzudie, Serge Clotaire Billong, Hermann Ngouakam, Joseph Le Doux Diffo, Hanny Eyongorock, Wilfred Mbacham

Abstract


The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies snake bites as neglected public health problem affecting mostly tropical and subtropical countries. In Africa there are an estimated 1 million snake bites annually with about half needing a specific treatment. Women, children and farmers in poor rural communities in developing countries are the most affected. Case management of snake bites are not adequate in many health facilities in developing countries where personnel are not always abreast with the new developments in snake bite management and in addition, quite often the anti-venom serum is lacking. We report the case of a medical doctor bitten by a cobra in the rural area of Poli, Cameroon while asleep in his bedroom. Lack of facilities coupled with poor case management resulted ina fatal outcome.

The Pan African Medical Journal 2016;24



http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2016.24.231.7576
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