From decentralization to commonization of HIV healthcare resources: keys to reduction in health disparity and equitable distribution of health services in Nigeria

  • Obinna Ositadimma Oleribe
  • Olabisi Abiodun Oladipo
  • Iheaka Paul Ezieme
  • Mary Margaret Elizabeth Crossey
  • Simon David Taylor-Robinson

Abstract

Access to quality care is essential for improved health outcomes. Decentralization improves access to healthcare services at lower levels of care, but it does not dismantle structural, funding and programming restrictions to access, resulting in inequity and inequality in population health. Unlike decentralization, Commonization Model of care reduces health inequalities and inequity, dismantles structural, funding and other program related obstacles to population health. Excellence and Friends Management Care Center (EFMC) using Commonization Model (CM), fully integrated HIV services into core health services in 121 supported facilities.This initiative improved access to care, treatment, support services, reduced stigmatization/discrimination, and improved uptake of HTC. We call on governments to adequately finance CM for health systems restructuring towards better health outcomes.

The Pan African Medical Journal 2016;24

Author Biographies

Obinna Ositadimma Oleribe
Excellence & Friends Management Care Centre (EFMC), Abuja, Nigeria
Olabisi Abiodun Oladipo
Excellence & Friends Management Care Centre (EFMC), Abuja, Nigeria
Iheaka Paul Ezieme
Excellence & Friends Management Care Centre (EFMC), Abuja, Nigeria
Mary Margaret Elizabeth Crossey
Hepatology Unit, Imperial College London, 10th Floor, QEQM Building, St Mary’s Hospital Campus, South Wharf Road, W2 1NY, London, United Kingdom; Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, 2, Murtala Mohammed Way, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria
Simon David Taylor-Robinson
Hepatology Unit, Imperial College London, 10th Floor, QEQM Building, St Mary’s Hospital Campus, South Wharf Road, W2 1NY, London, United Kingdom
Published
2016-09-28
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1937-8688