Programmatic implications of some vitamin A supplementation and deworming determinants among children aged 6-59 months in resource-poor rural Kenya

  • Shadrack Oiye Independent Public Health Research and Nutrition Consultant, Nairobi, Kenya; University of Nairobi Institute of Tropical and Infectious Diseases, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Ngowa Safari Medical Assistance Program International, MAP (Kenya Program), Bible Translation Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Joseph Anyango Medical Assistance Program International, MAP (Kenya Program), Bible Translation Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Carolyne Arimi Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Benzadze Nyawa Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Mbesa Kimeu Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Joseph Odinde Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Oscar Kambona Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Rachel Kahindi Ministry of Health, Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Richard Mutisya Centre for Public Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), KNH, Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

Introduction: controlling vitamin A deficiency and soil-transmitted helminth infections are public health imperatives. We aimed at revealing some caregiver and child-related determinants of uptake of vitamin A supplementation and deworming, and examine their programmatic implications in Kenyan context.

Methods: a cross-sectional study of randomly selected 1,177 households with infants and young children aged 6-59 months in three of the 47 counties of Kenya. The number of times a child was given vitamin A supplements and dewormed 6 months and one year preceding the study was extracted from mother-child health books.

Results: coverage for age-specific deworming was considerably depressed compared to corresponding vitamin A supplementation and for both services, twice-yearly provisions were disproportionately lower than half-yearly. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed relatively younger children, of Islam-affiliated caregivers (vis a vis Christians) and those who took less time to nearest health facilities as more likely to be supplemented with vitamin A. Similar observations were made for deworming where additionally, maternal and child ages were also determinants in favour of older groups. Other studied factors were not significant determinants. Programmatic allusions of the determining factors were discussed.

Conclusion: key to improving uptake of vitamin A supplementation and deworming among Kenyan 6-59 months olds are: increasing access to functional health facilities, expanding outreaches and campaigns, dispelling faith-related misconceptions and probably modulating caregiver and child age effects by complementing nutrition literacy with robust and innovative caregiver reminders. Given analogous service points and scheduling, relative lower uptake of deworming warrants further investigations.

Published
2019-02-28
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1937-8688