Elevated plasma homocysteine in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases

  • Maria Onomhaguan Ebesunun
  • Esther Odunayo Obajobi

Abstract

Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration has been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic individuals independent of conventional risk factors. Available study in Nigerian-Africans is scare. Methods: Seventy (30 males) and (40 females) type 2 diabetes mellitus, with age mean of 54 ± 11.52 years were selected for this study and thirty apparently healthy volunteers were included as controls. The biochemical parameters and anthropometric indices were determined using standard procedures. Results: Significant increases were obtained in body weight, body mass index (p<0.001) and waist circumference (p<0.012) when compared with the corresponding control values respectively. The fasting plasma glucose (p<0.01), tHcy (p<0.02), and triglyceride (p<0.03) were significantly higher in the diabetes group when compared with the corresponding control values. The plasma folic acid and vitamin B12 (p<0.05) were significantly reduced compared to the control values. The tHcy (p<0.01) was significantly higher in the males when compared with the corresponding female value. Significant decrease was obtained in the plasma triglyceride (p<0.003) in the male patients when compared with the female patients. Conclusion: Our result showed increased plasma tHcy, triglyceride and waist circumference as well as decreased folic acid and vitamin B12 in type 2 diabetes mellitus. These alteratsupions are risk factors for premature CVD events.

Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 12:48

Author Biographies

Maria Onomhaguan Ebesunun
Department of Chemical Pathology and Immunology Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences Olabisi Onabanjo University Sagamu, Nigeria
Esther Odunayo Obajobi
Department of Chemical Pathology Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospital Ile Ife, Nigeria
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1937-8688