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Research Journal of Health Sciences

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Patterns and determinants of contraceptives utilization in a religiously homogeneous settlement: a Nigerian case study

J.C. Ene, Y Adewoyin, N.A. Chukwu

Abstract


Objective: To identify the determinants of contraceptive utilization in a religiously homogenous settlement in Nigeria.

Methods: Using Nsukka, Enugu State as a case study, the study utilized primary data generated using a structured questionnaire administered on 600 female respondents aged 15-49 on pre/post-natal care hospital visits. The datasets were analyzed at univariate and bivariate levels and using binary regression.

Results: Women aged 20–29 constituted 44.6% of the respondents, 80% were married, 80.2% were Christians, 42.1% had secondary education, 5.2% earned above N80,000 monthly and 56.8% used contraceptives. Variations in contraceptive use were found to be significantly associated with age, income, occupation and religion (P < 0.05) while the regression analyses showed that religion was the only significant predictor of contraceptive use among the sample (P < 0.05). Being unemployed became significant only when religion was controlled for.

Conclusion: With religion being a more dominant determinant of contraceptive utilization, even in a largely religiously-homogeneous settlement, scaling up contraceptive usage for population health and development should involve health professionals and social workers in their various churches.

Keywords: Contraceptive Use, Religion, Health Professionals, Social Workers, Nsukka, Nigeria




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