Knowledge and utilization of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services among pregnant women in Tanzania

  • Esther Ngadaya National Institute for Medical Research-Muhimbili Research Centre
  • Angela Shija National Institute for Medical Research, Headquarters, Dar es Salaam
  • Calvin Sindato National Institute for Medical Research, Tabora Research Centre
  • Amos Kahwa National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam,
  • Godfather Kimaro National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam,
  • Mbazi Senkoro National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
  • Nicholaus Mnaymbwa National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
  • Doreen Philibert NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH
  • Togolai Mbilu National Institute for Medical Research, Tabora Research Centre
  • Celina Mandara National Institute for Medical Research, Tanga Medical Research Centre
  • Ramadhani Shemtandulo National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
  • Thomas Mwinyeheri National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
  • Aman Wilfred National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
  • Sayoki Mfinanga National Institute for Medical Research Medical Research, Muhimbili Centre, Dar es Salaam
Keywords: Prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT); mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT); antenatal care (ANC); HIV/AIDS

Abstract

Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among children is mainly vectored through mother-to-child transmission. Prevention of mother-to-child-transmission strategy is highly effective; however, its accessibility and utilization is affected by the lack of knowledge among other factors.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among antenatal care attendees in two districts in Tanzania to determine their knowledge and utilization of the prevention of MTCT services.

Results:  We interviewed 160 antenatal care attendees aged 18-45 years with a mean (SD) age of 30.4 (6.3) years; 74 (46.2 %) were HIV-infected. HIV-infected women demonstrated significantly correct knowledge of HIV (p=0.001) and AIDS (p=0.014) than uninfected individuals. HIV-infected women also significantly demonstrated correct knowledge of mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy than HIV-uninfected women (p=0.016) and during delivery (p=0.005). A significant proportion of HIV-positive women compared to HIV-negative women were aware that correct use of antiretroviral during pregnancy can reduce the risk of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV (p<0.039), but only 6 (3.75%) of all women were aware that correct use of antiretroviral during delivery can significantly reduce the risk of mother-to-child-transmission. HIV-infected women had significant comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS (p=0.001) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (p=0.006) than HIV-negative women. Comprehensive knowledge prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was low among the study participants. Male partners’ involvement in maternal antenatal care was significantly higher among HIV-infected women than males from the HIV-infected women group (p<0.006).

Conclusion: The study demonstrated inadequate knowledge of PMTCT among women who made ANC visits. HIV uninfected women had poorer knowledge compared to the HIV-infected ones. Routine HIV counseling and testing services were highly accepted among these women.

Published
2021-10-10
How to Cite
NgadayaE., ShijaA., SindatoC., KahwaA., KimaroG., SenkoroM., MnaymbwaN., PhilibertD., MbiluT., MandaraC., ShemtanduloR., MwinyeheriT., WilfredA., & MfinangaS. (2021). Knowledge and utilization of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services among pregnant women in Tanzania. Tanzania Journal of Health Research, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.4314/thrb.v22i1.5
Section
Original Article

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1821-9241
print ISSN: 1821-6404