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Acta Structilia

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Continuing Professional Development in the quantity surveying profession: Quantity surveyors’ perceptions

Juan Olwagen, Roy Cumberlege, Ian Moss

Abstract


This research study was conducted in order to investigate Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the South African quantity surveying profession. The study further aimed to establish the reasons why some quantity surveyors do not acquire the required CPD hours and face losing their professional registration with the South African Council for the Quantity Surveying Profession (SACQSP). Practising quantity surveyors’ perceptions in terms of CPD was investigated in order to establish whether there are factors restricting their participation in CPD as well as to determine whether quantity surveyors regard CPD as beneficial and value adding to them as individual as well as the profession.

Data to conduct the study was gathered via a national web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire was structured to investigate the respondents’ perceptions regarding the importance of CPD as well as relating evidence to various aspects of CPD, as drawn from the literature. One hundred and thirty-eight registered quantity surveyors participated in the survey.

The research established that quantity surveyors regarded handing in their CPD records on time as the most important factor when participating in CPD. It was found that quantity surveyors lack a structured approach to CPD, suggesting that they merely engage in CPD when they have adequate time. With regard to CPD Category 1, respondents regard seminars as the most important; however, the majority of the respondents participate in Acta Structilia by completing a short questionnaire relating to published articles. With regard to CPD Category 2, respondents regard mentoring of professional candidates as the most important, and most often engage in this activity. Respondents indicated that the most significant barrier to participation in CPD is time related, with work commitments restricting participation. Respondents were neutral to the statement that quantity surveyors not complying with CPD requirements should be de registered. Respondents regarded CPD as beneficial as well as a value adding activity, although it takes up much of their valuable time.

The study identified changes made to the CPD system and explains how the processes differ from those of previous years. The study will be beneficial to the SACQSP in improving the CPD system and highlighting its shortcomings, benefitting the quantity surveying profession as a whole.

Keywords: Continuing professional development, quantity surveying, perception




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