Postnatal Care within One Week and Associated Factors among Women Who Gave Birth in Ameya District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, 2018: Cross Sectional Study

  • Teshome Melesse Belihu
  • Ababe Tamirat Deressa
Keywords: Postnatal care utilization, mothers, Oromia region

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Globally recorded large number of maternal and neonatal deaths are related to complications during pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum. Most neonatal deaths occur during the first week of life. It is also evidenced that the level of postnatal care utilization in Ethiopia is very low. This study aimed to assess postnatal care utilization within one week and associated factors among women who had given birth in the last six weeks in Ameya district, Oromia, Ethiopia.
METHODS: Cross sectional study design was employed on 332 study participants who were selected by systemic sampling method and interviewed using structured questionnaires. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 23.0. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the associated factors with the outcome variable. Figures, tables and sentences were used for the presentation of descriptive statistics.
RESULT: The finding revealed that the proportion of postnatal care utilization within one-week in the study area is 25.3%. Partner occupation[AOR=5.575, 95% CI= (1.071, 29.023)], mothers who had complication during labor and delivery[AOR=7.841, 95% CI= (2.287, 26.879)], distance from mothers to health facilities[AOR=5.127, 95% CI= (1.149, 22.878)] and awareness on postnatal care within one week services[AOR=4.161, 95% CI= (1.300, 13.314)] were the main contributing factors of postnatal care utilization within one-week.
CONCLUSION: Postnatal care utilization within one-week is very low (25.3%). Partner occupation, complication during labor and delivery, distance from health facilities and awareness on postnatal care within one week service were the associated factors.

Published
2020-05-01
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1029-1857
print ISSN: 1029-1857