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Child labour activities in a changing world: Evidences from a metropolis in Nigeria

Joseph A Oluyemi, Mohammed Y. Abubakar, Raji Abudulateef, Emmanuel Atolagbe, Joseph A. Adejoke, Williams Taiwo Motolani

Abstract


The incidence of child labour is fast increasing in Nigeria with many children becoming victims of illiteracy, violence, rape, kidnap, teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections which they may not have the capacity to cope with because of their age. This study explores child labour activities in a metropolis in Nigeria. The aim of this study is to unravel the factors responsible for the increase in incidences of child labour in the study population. The study was conducted among children who engage in child labour in Ilorin metropolis, North-Central Nigeria. This study employed qualitative research approach using unstructured in-depth interviews that were conducted in Yoruba, pidgin and English languages. Twenty (20) participants, who were purposively selected, were included in the study. The study focused on two groups of participants namely: children that engage in hawking and children who engage in house help activities in households in the metropolis. Findings from the study revealed that, poverty as a result of low income in many families is a strong determinant of child labour among the participants. Other factors such as the need for children to exchange child labour activities for education and personal development, the need to live a better life, the need to earn a living and the need to fend for themselves were also revealed in the study as determinants to child labour in the metropolis. The study recommends that government should impose stiffer punishments for offenders of child labour offences to serve as deterrents for parents and wards who engage their children in labour activities


Keywords: Financial support, Family needs, Poor, Hunger, Mal-treatment.




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