PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH

Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management

Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

Remember me or Register



An appraisal of physicochemical parameters and some trace metals at the disposal points of five industrial effluents in Trans-Amadi Industrial Area of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

T.N. Chikwe, M.C. Onojake

Abstract


Industrial effluent samples collected from the disposal point of five different companies in Trans-Amadi industrial area of Port Harcourt were analyzed to investigate effect on the environment. The analyzed effluent samples showed results of the physicochemical parameters and trace metals in the ranges : (pH 3.60 - 6.90), electrical conductivity (406.00 – 722.00 μs/cm), total dissolved solid (194.00-347.00 mg/l); total suspended solid (>1067.00), chloride (14.20-151.10mg/l), sulphate (20.40-25.30 mg/l), nitrate (3.00-3.20 mg/l), total organic carbon (4.57-1556.00 mg/l), chemical oxygen demand (20.00-6225.00 mg/l), iron (1.26-1.68 mg/l), zinc (0.02 mg/l), copper (0.06 mg/l), lead (0.38mg/l), nickel (0.56-0.93mg/l), cadmium (0.09-0.34mg/l), chromium (0.19 mg/l) and sodium (11.45-20.77mg/l). The results obtained were compared with World Health Organization and United State Environmental Protection Act (USEPA), maximum permissible limits. Results showed that pH, chloride, conductivity and total organic carbon values of samples from three industries were above the maximum permissible limit while TSS values of samples from the five industries were above specification. Only one Industry produced an effluent with a chemical oxygen demand within the allowable limit. Some heavy metals like Nickel, Cadmium, and Chromium were also above the USEPA maximum permissible limit. Total suspended solids were determined using Pressure Millipore Vacuum Pump Assembly (NACE TM-01-73), Concentrations of Chloride, Sulphate, Nitrate, Total organic carbon (TOC) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) were determined using a DR 2800 Spectrophotometer. Heavy metals were determined using Atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin–Elmer model 2280/2380 model).

Keywords: Heavy metals, Industrial effluents, Pollution, Spectrophotometer, Physicochemical, Concentration




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jasem.v21i1.4
AJOL African Journals Online