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Nigerian Journal of Medicine

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Pattern of Bone Tumours Seen In A Regional Orthopaedic Hospital In Nigeria

OA Lasebikan, CU Nwadinigwe, EC Onyegbule

Abstract


Background: Primary bone tumour is a challenge to Orthopaedic surgeons working in developing countries due to late presentation as a result of ignorance and poverty. This is further compounded by limited number of specialist personnel, diagnostic and therapeutic centres. Consequently, they are associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality, which can be reduced with early presentation.
Materials and methods: This is a retrospective review of all histologically proven primary bone tumours seen at National Orthopaedic hospital Enugu,South east Nigeria, over a 6 year period.
Results: Sixty eight (68) cases met the study criteria and were reviewed. Male:Female ratio was 1.35:1, with a mean age of 22.8years and peak frequency in the 11-20years age range. A total of 28(41.1%) were benign, 21(30.9%) were malignant while 19(27.9%) were tumour-like conditions. The commonest benign tumour was osteochondroma, accounting for 44.7% of non-malignant lesions, while fibrous dysplasia was the commonest tumour-like condition(23.4%). Primary malignant bone tumours accounted for 30.9% of all pathologies, with osteosarcoma(17) accounting for 80.1% of all malignant lesions. The commonest region affected is the leg i.e proximal tibia. Duration of symptoms before presentation ranged from 1month to 12years, with the commonest presenting complaint being a
painless lump.
Conclusion: Primary bone tumours is commonest in young males, usually benign and affecting the Tibia. Associated late presentation results in increased morbidity and mortality. Hence, efforts need to be geared towards public enlightenment in developing countries, to ensure early presentation, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality.



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