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South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition

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Acceptance of a ready-to-use supplementary food by stable HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated patients

K Pillay, M Siwela, FJ Veldman, BP Mabaso

Abstract


Objectives: The objective of the study was to determine consumer  acceptance and perceptions of a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF)
by subjects treated for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected subjects).
Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted.
Subjects: One hundred and thirty-nine stable HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated patients participated in the study. Sixty-eight healthy subjects served as the control group.
Setting: The setting was Northdale Hospital and Grey’s Hospital in  Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal.
Outcome measures: Acceptance of the RUSF was assessed using a five-point facial hedonic scale by stable HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated patients (n = 139) from Northdale Hospital and Grey’s Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal. Perceptions of the RUSF were determined through focus group discussions in which HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated patients (n = 43) participated.
Results: The overall acceptance of the RUSF was significantly associated with the health status of the subjects (p-value < 0.05). Overall, the product was liked by more than 90% of the HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated individuals compared to 85% of the control group. More than 90% of the HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis   (co-infected)-treated individuals liked the taste, compared to 87% of the control group. The colour and mouth feel were rated to be “good” by more than 80% of the HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (coinfected)-treated group, compared to approximately 70% of the healthy group. Focus group discussions revealed that the subjects perceived the mouth feel of the RUSF to be “rough”, and that as a health supplement, the RUSF should be provided free of charge, or at a reasonable cost, at public health centres.
Conclusion: The RUSF was found to be highly acceptable to stable   HIV-treated and HIV and tuberculosis (co-infected)-treated subjects, although concern was raised about the mouth feel.



http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16070658.2014.11734482
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