The Relationship between Serum Vitamin D Level and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Females in Mosul City

  • Janan A. Alrefaee
  • Ban K. Rushdi
  • Ghada K. Adeeb
Keywords: psychosomatic symptom, vit D, depression, vit D3 supplementation

Abstract

Background: A widespread severe deficiency of vitamin D (vit D) exists in Iraq, especially among women of reproductive age. Depression or anxiety is related to deficiency of vit D. These patients may present with psychosomatic symptoms which are symptoms with no sufficient organic cause in the body but from psychological causality. The study aimed to investigate the serum level of vit D in females with psychosomatic symptoms residing in Mosul City, Iraq and explore the effect of vitamin D3 (vit D3) supplements for treating psychosomatic symptoms.
Methods: A total of 73 female patients aged 15–45 years presented with several symptoms. All patients underwent physical examination and psychiatric interviews. Patients with minimal to mild depression were selected. All included patients underwent investigation of first serum vit D level. The supplementation with vitamin D3 was started. The second serum vit D level was investigated at first post-improvement visit.
Results: In the improved group, the post-supplementation serum vit D level was higher than that before the supplementation (p = 0.00). In addition, the vit D serum difference before and after its supplementation was greater in the improved group than the nonimproved one (p = 0.00). Patients not only experienced improvement in their mood swings, but also recovered from other recorded symptoms such as headache, fatigue, tiredness, and joint pain.
Conclusion: This study revealed a noticeable association concerning serum levels of 25-OH D and mild depression in addition to  psychosomatic symptoms in females living in Mosul City. Supplementation with suitable loading vit D3 dosages improved these symptoms showing a probable causal relationship.

Keywords: psychosomatic symptom, vit D, depression, vit D3 supplementation

Published
2021-07-01
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1858-5051