PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH

African Health Sciences

Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

Remember me or Register



The association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study

Nyobasi Gesase, Jaume Miranda-Rius, Lluís Brunet-Llobet, Eduard Lahor-Soler, Michael J Mahande, Gileard Masenga

Abstract


Background: For the past two decades, studies have investigated the relationship between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, low birth weight and preterm premature rupture of membranes.
Objectives: To determine the prevalence of periodontal disease and associated adverse pregnancy outcomes among women delivering at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC).
Methods: This cross-sectional study was based on the use of patients’ files, clinical examinations and oral interviews with mothers who delivered at the KCMC. Pregnant women with singleton babies (N=1117) who delivered at the KCMC were recruited for the study. Intra-oral examination was performed within five days of birth. The Community Periodontal Index was used to assess periodontal disease
Results: The prevalence of periodontal disease was 14.2%. Periodontal disease was significantly associated with higher odds of pre-eclampsia [adjusted Odds Ratio 95% Confidence Interval (aOR=4.12;95%CI:2.20-7.90)], low birth weight (aOR=2.41;95%CI:1.34-4.33) and preterm birth (aOR=2.32;95%CI:1.33-4.27). There was no significant association between periodontal disease and preterm premature rupture of membranes (aORs 1.83;95%CI:0.75-4.21) and eclampsia (3.71;95%CI:0.80-17.13).
Conclusion: Maternal periodontal disease is a potential independent risk indicator for pre-eclampsia, low birth weight, and preterm birth. Periodontal assessment and therapy should form part of the preventive antenatal care provided to women in developing countries.

Keywords: Preterm birth; low birth weight; pre-eclampsia; eclampsia; preterm premature rupture of membranes; periodontal disease; periodontitis; cross-sectional studies.




AJOL African Journals Online