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Diagnostic performance of several biomarkers for identification of cases of non-communicable diseases among Central Africans

Charles Bitamazire Businge, Benjamin Longo-Mbenza, Oladele Vincent Adeniyi, Moise Mvitu Muaka, Georges Mvumbi Lelo, Mireille Solange Nganga Nkanga, Jean-Marie Kavembe, Baudoin Buassa-bu-Tsumbu, Jean-Rene’ M’buyamba Kabangu, Daniel Ter Goon

Abstract


Background: This study determined the diagnostic performance of new biomarkers for a composite diagnosis of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among Central Africans.
Methods:  This case-control study was conducted at LOMO Medical Centre, Kinshasa, DR Congo (DRC) between January – December, 2008. The cases comprised 226 participants with concurrent presence of at least 2 or more of NCDs. Anthropometric parameters and blood pressure were measured while blood samples were assayed for biomarkers. The receiver operating characteristics curve and the logistic regression model were applied.
Results: Serum selenium (Se) had specificity and sensitivity of 72.4% and 91.1%, respectively with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.802; Nitric oxide (NO) (specificity: 72.4%; sensitivity: 93.0%) (AUC = 0.800); Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels > 6 Mu/L (specificity: 75%; sensitivity: 65%) (AUC = 0.0.727); serum calcium levels of ≥ 110g/L (specificity: 76%; sensitivity: 75%) (AUC = 0.822); and daily salt intake of ≥10 g/day (specificity: 75%; sensitivity: 67%) (AUC = 0.653) in the diagnosis of all NCDs, which were all highly significant (<0.0001).  
Conclusion: Serum Se, NO, calcium, TSH and daily salt intake had high diagnostic performance as biomarkers for identification of patients with concurrent NCDs in the study population.

Keywords: Non-communicable diseases, diet, new biomarkers, Central Africa.




AJOL African Journals Online