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Effect of cut seed tubers and pre-germination on potato tuber yield

Pape Diop, Elhadji Serigne Sylla, Mamadou Diatte, Babacar Labou, Karamoko Diarra

Abstract


Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is one of the important vegetable crops in Senegal with the potential to improve the national food supply and economic benefits to smallholder producers. Experiment was conducted from November 2015 to March 2016 to assess the impact of cut seed tubers and pre-germination on seed tuber storage conditions on potato tubers yield. Four treatments were used for experiment. Pre-plant seed treatments were (T1) 136 whole seed tubers 45-55 g then pre-germinated; (T2) 68 cutted tubers 22-28 g then pre-germinated; (T3) 68 pre-germinated seed tubers then cut 22-28 g; (T) 136 whole seed tubers 45-55 g not pre-germinated (maintained 4 °C). Plants grown from whole and pre-germinated seed tubers had significantly higher yield and more number of secondary stems per plant, when compared to cut and or no pre-germinated seed (P < 0.001). Daughter tubers produced from cut seed resulted in higher small size potato tubers than those from whole seed (P < 0.001). However, no significant difference was found on potato seed emergence. Our results indicated a clear advantage to plant whole and pre-germinated seed potatoes with the aim of producing healthier daughter tubers and increasing yields.

Keywords: Seed potato, whole seed, pre-germination, Niayes, Senegal.



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