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Journal of the Ghana Science Association

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The non-acidogenic potential of two Ghanaian meals

Frederick Kwaku Addai, Isaac Kwasi Nuamah

Abstract





This study tested whether a meal of Ga Kenkey and fried fish with tomato/pepper sauce (kenkey and fish), or fried ripened plantain with beans (Red-Red) is acidogenic. The pH of baseline saliva given by volunteers prior to eating a meal, and at specific intervals after the meal (effect saliva) was measured using a Kent EIL 7020 pH meter. As control, volunteers were given a “glucose challenge” in which they rinsed their mouths with a 5% glucose solution for exactly 60 seconds. Changes in pH of effect saliva were determined with reference to their respective baseline saliva. The mean pH of saliva changed significantly by negative 0.50 ten minutes after the glucose challenge and negative 0.23 a further five minutes later. Immediately after a meal of “Red-Red” the mean pH of saliva significantly changed by positive 0.45. Ten and 15 minutes after the meal the mean saliva pH changes were positive 0.13 and positive 0.06, respectively. The mean pH of saliva changed by positive 0.39 fifteen minutes after volunteers ate kenkey and fish, and twenty-five minutes after the meal the mean change in pH was positive 0.10. The reduction in pH of saliva below baseline value after the glucose challenge confirmed its acidogenic potential. Since there was no depression of saliva pH below baseline values after volunteers had eaten either of the two meals, it is concluded that “Red-Red”, as well as kenkey and fish have non-acidogenic potential. By extension, this suggests that either meal has non-cariogenic or cariostatic effect.

JOURNAL OF THE GHANA SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Volume 2 No. 2 (2000) pp. 1-9



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