Effects of inclusion of varying levels of three natural spices on the mineral composition and organoleptic properties of West African soft unripened cheese (“WARA”)

  • FO Ogunleke
  • AO Akinsoyinu
Keywords: Cheese, minerals, organoleptic properties, bearberry, ginger, onion

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of inclusion of 1%, 2% and 3% bearberry, ginger and onion extracts on the mineral composition and organoleptic properties of cheese. Data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance using a 3x3 factorial arrangement in a Completely Randomised Design.

West African Soft Unripened cheese was prepared using 7.5ml Calotropis procera in 500ml of milk . The mineral content of the various cheese samples were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). A total of twenty (20) respondents were used for sensory evaluation which was carried out on a hedonic scale of 1-9.

The results showed that the mineral content of cheese was enhanced by the various inclusion levels of bear berry, ginger and onion. The control consistently had lower values of Ca, PO4, Fe, Mg and Zn. However, organoleptic studies showed that addition of varying levels of bear berry, ginger and onion did not improve the colour, texture, flavor, taste, aroma and general acceptability of cheese. Similar (P>0.05) colour and taste scores of 7.56 and 6.98, 6.91 and 6.40, 7.00 and 6.36, 7.01 and 6.11 were obtained for the control, 1%, 3% bearberry and 3% ginger respectively. All the cheese samples were similarly acceptable except 2% onion which had a significantly (P<0.05) lower score (6.21) than the control. It was concluded and recommended that production and consumption of cheese produced with 1%, 2% and 3% bearberry and ginger and 1% and 3% onion be encouraged as addition of these levels of spices to cheese improved the mineral content of cheese, though it did not enhance its organoleptic properties.

Keywords: Cheese, minerals, organoleptic properties, bearberry, ginger, onion

Published
2016-03-22
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1597-0906