Analyses of determinants of adaptation to climate change among arable crop farmers in the federal capital territory, Abuja

  • AD Onu
  • EB Tologbonse
  • OB Adeniji
  • ME Ejechi
Keywords: Climate change, Adaptation, Mitigation, Perception.

Abstract

The study examined the factors influencing arable crop farmers‘ adaptation to climate change in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. Using multistage random sampling technique, 120 respondents were selected for detailed study. Focus Group Discussion and structured questionnaire were used to elicit information from the respondents. Data obtained were analyzed using Binomial Logit regression model, descriptive and inferential statistics. The respondents were within the mean age of 38years and majority (60.1%) of them were male. Farmers‘ perception of climate change were increasing temperature ( ̅=4.7), increasing rainfall ( ̅=4.3) and unpredictable weather ( ̅=4.6). Farmers‘ major sources of information on climate change were personal experiences (92.5%) and radio (43.3%). The perception of the effect of climate change on arable crop production were increased heat stress on crops ( ̅=4.5), high incidences of pest and diseases ( ̅=4.5), increased frequency of flooding ( ̅=3.6) and reduced yield of crops ( ̅=3.8). Identified adaptation strategies used by farmers‘ to mitigate climate change included multi-crop agriculture (100%), mulching of crops to reduce water loss (99.2%) and changes in planting dates (95%). Results of the Logit regression analysis showed that farm size, extension contact and farming experience were positive and significantly influenced adaptation to climate change at 1%, 5% and 10% level of significance respectively. The study recommended that agricultural extension service should brace up to the new challenges posed by climate change by promoting awareness programmes, engaging in a multi-media enlightenment campaign on climate change and the retraining of extension agents to acquire the new knowledge in climate change management.

Keywords: Climate change, Adaptation, Mitigation, Perception.

Published
2014-11-21
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 0300-368X