Female genital mutilation and its effects: Implications for counselling

  • BI Nnodum Faculty of Education, Imo State University, Owerri

Abstract



Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or female circumcision as it is generally called is an age old traditional practice in many countries including Nigeria. The practice was based on certain beliefs, one of which is that it helps to reduce female promiscuity. Research has shown that FGM has numerous psycho-physiological consequences. This study tried to establish if there is any relationship between promiscuity and FGM, if circumcised females suffer depression more than the uncircumcised females and, if circumcised females have less difficulty than their uncircumcised counterparts in becoming sexually aroused and attaining orgasm. Three null hypotheses guided the study and data obtained were analysed using t-test statistics. The findings revealed that FGM does not reduce promiscuity, that circumcised females experience depression more than uncircumcised and, that circumcised females have more difficulty than their uncircumcised counterparts in becoming sexually aroused and attaining orgasm. Psycho-counselling measures for helping FGM victims manage their lives, achieve sexual satisfaction and become better adjusted were highlighted.

The Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling Vol. 8 (1) 2002: pp. 112-132
Published
2007-02-05
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 0794-0831